Mistaken Wisdom

Sermon Delivered at First Parish Cambridge, Unitarian Universalist, November 5, 2017*

I bought a Garmin GPS watch this week in an effort to kick start my fitness regimen which has been sidelined by seminary and moving and internship since about 2014.  Its fun.  Olive hates the beep it makes.  I like the fact that it counts my steps and also receives my text messages.  While I was shopping for this, I was brought back to my days as a fitness instructor when the big thing was to have a heartrate monitor built into your watch.  Things have come a long way.

I see a lot of people with FitBits and other devices, reminding them to walk…or reminding them that they have a pulse.  Sometimes I wonder if this is the closest that many people come to actually thinking about their bodies. Technology has become a not so thin veil between us and our experiences. Our devices respond to our voices, our touch, even our body temperature.  Artificial intelligence is becoming less and less artificial and more and more supplementary each day.  But today, I would like to make a case for us to get back to basics so to speak…

So, I have every intention of going a bit off the rails today.  When I say that, it is not to indicate that I’m going to stand on top of the pulpit and crow like a rooster…although, I’d love to see what that feels like.  Rather, I’m going to speak to you in a way that ministers in Unitarian Universalism rarely if ever speak; with demands and an undercurrent of ultimatum…a bit fire and brimstone.  But this is important; the future of our movement and possibly the world as we know it depends on leaders like myself stepping up our game and pushing the boundaries much, much further.  But no matter how uncomfortable or confusing it may be at first to receive, my hope is that you ultimately feel my push as the gesture of love that it is intended to be and not as a selfish directive.  What I say today may also sound like scolding, but it is not. It is intended as a wakeup call to us all.

And with that, we begin…

Mosaic Makers

I love Unitarian Universalism, but Unitarian Universalism isn’t working.  Well, it may be working for a few people, but it is not working in the grand and lofty way that we certainly speak of it.  Indeed, Unitarian Universalism may be working for certain individual and self-focused purposes, but what we’re doing here just doesn’t want to take hold in the wider world.  We have not succeeded in moving the dial in terms of ending gun violence, Nazism, violence against women or racism; we’re even moving backward on abortion rights and healthcare in general.  Our efforts to build the Beloved Community are failing.  Sometimes I wonder if it is because we are much better at building the Beloved Social Club.  We do great at self-improvement among the people we know, but on the whole, we have not cultivated the tools or even the interest in changing hearts and minds beyond our immediate sphere. Even though we may feel good about our contributions to amplifying awareness of the distress of those who are marginalized and placing ourselves into the work on the ground to change individual lives, the Dakota Access pipeline is brimming with oil even as we speak and the Klan is still legal. This is not what I call success.

I love Unitarian Universalism, but Unitarian Universalism isn’t working.

We have the highest ideals.  Inspired by some of the greatest hearts and minds.  Among those hearts and minds is of course Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. We are nobly motivated by aspirations such as this quote put forth by the King Center:

Dr. King’s Beloved Community is a global vision in which all people can share in the wealth of the earth. In the Beloved Community, poverty, hunger and homelessness will not be tolerated because international standards of human decency will not allow it. Racism and all forms of discrimination, bigotry and prejudice will be replaced by an all-inclusive spirit of sisterhood and brotherhood. [1]

And we can even point to more of MLK’s scholarship to describe the lofty philosophical underpinnings of his beloved community as an expression of Agape.  He said in his March 7, 1961 Detroit sermon:

“Agape is more than romantic love. Agape is more than friendship. Agape is understanding, redemptive goodwill for all men. Agape is an overflowing love, a spontaneous love, which seeks nothing in return.”[2]

Sounds great!  So, where are the droves of marginalized people flocking to our doors?  I have yet to hear anyone within Unitarian Universalism tell me why anyone outside of Unitarian Universalism should come to us for this message.  We are spectacular at telling everyone what we want as individuals and standing up for our personal sense of right and wrong and making sure that personal agency is at the center of everything we do and say.  But tell me, how is that Beloved Community and not simply the Beloved Self?

Last week, I had the incredible fortune to travel to San Diego for the Mosaic Makers conference.  It was wonderful.  I was there with Alex Taylor, Rashid Shaikh, Susan Leslie and Bruce Pritchard all of whom I think got a great deal out of the experience.  I was so incredibly grateful for their presence and excited for them to see that place, First UU San Diego, that was so instrumental to my formation.  It was certainly one of the most diverse UU settings I’ve seen outside of Finding Our Way Home (the UU gathering for professionals of color.)  From the perspective of a trip that shows what anti-racism and multi-culturalism can look like, it was a huge success.

The weekend presented many examples where we completely de-centered whiteness: a Día de Muertos service that was entirely Latina led in Spanish and English where Spanish was the dominant language and sometimes not translated.  Two black scholars leading very different talks.  Dr. Takiyah Nur Amin speaking about Black Lives of Unitarian Universalism and explaining its purpose as an incubator for cultivating black affirmation, support and retention of African American UUs; Dr. Mark Hicks challenging the conference attendees to explore how white supremacy shows up in language and action.  Rev. Mitra Rahnema sharing her intentions as the editor of the book Centering and making it clear that she wrote the book for people of color as a resource while inviting white UUs to read the book with this in mind and learn from looking through this window and Chris Crass offering an impassioned plea to stay in the work of cultivating multi-culturalism despite our sometimes problematic personal histories.

As a leader, Mosaic Makers was exactly what I needed in many ways.  Still, on the last day when I was there for a separate professional day of reflection where we caucused as POC identified and white identified, I found myself wondering about the distinctly separate Unitarian Universalisms that each of us cultivates and that grow among those of similar social locations.  The dominant one that supports the experiences and needs and expressions of European Americans, another one that speaks to African Americans… another that resonates with Indian Americans…one that lets women see themselves…and another that works for people who identify as Trans*.

On one level, having a “faith” that is this malleable seems ideal.  But looking a bit closer and in particular looking to where the rifts and cracks actually exist in our “beloved community”, and in examining the very real inabilities to communicate, the dysfunctions, the ongoing inequities and our sometimes defiant resistance to appeal to a broader spectrum of populations, what we have created is a loose gathering of people who have no real reason or explanation as to why they should want to be in community together other than working toward a concept of “beloved community” that sometimes looks like rabid individualism when you hold a mirror up to it.

No, and it pains me to say it again, Unitarian Universalism isn’t working.

Anti-Slavery, 1854

Let’s take a journey back in time…

In 1854, Anthony Burns was arrested. Anthony Burns was black.  Anthony Burns was an escaped slave.  He was arrested here in Massachusetts because the legislature supported enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act.  Judge Edward Loring presided over the case and handed down the judgement that Burns should be returned as “property.”  As I research the history of slavery in this state, I am learning that the “official records” most likely don’t correlate with the realities of the ongoing presence of slaves and certainly the mentality that actively ignored if not supported the continuation of slavery in the south.

Thankfully though people like William Lloyd Garrison among other abolitionists and Unitarians were outraged.  That year, he was part of a July 4 anti-slavery rally held in Framingham at a place called Harmony Grove.  At the gathering there were addresses by Lucy Stone, Wendell Phillips, Henry David Thoreau, Sojourner Truth and of course Garrison.  Garrison made a powerful case explaining the breadth and potential reach of slavery.  The MA historical society website says that Garrison warned that:

Slavery and its minions jeopardized freedom everywhere and its advocates, […], intended to tighten their grasp over the Caribbean, expand into Central and South America, and even extend the cursed institution into the Pacific. Freedom was disappearing. What could there be to celebrate on July 4? he asked.

The website goes on to describe the dramatic climax of Garrison’s address…

Garrison then produced a copy of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law and put a match to it. Amid cries of “Amen” the hated document burned to a cinder. Then he produced copies of Judge Edward G. Loring’s decision to send Anthony Burns back to slavery …As Martin Luther had burned copies of canon law and the papal bull excommunicating him from the Catholic Church for heresy, Garrison consigned [this] to the flames. [Finally] Holding up a copy of the U.S. Constitution, he branded it as “the source and parent of all the other atrocities–‘a covenant with death, and an agreement with hell.'” As the nation’s founding document burned to ashes, he cried out: “So perish all compromises with tyranny!” [3]

Clearly, White House Chief of Staff, General Kelly could learn a thing or two about “compromise” from reading this.

Garrison’s act of burning the Constitution was extreme.  Many would regard this as an act of treason…even today.  But let me present it to you this way.  We are very accustomed in UU circles to speaking of “racial justice work”.  Yet in my world as an African American, “racial justice” isn’t something that I can pick up and put down.  It doesn’t sit outside of me for me to look at…it IS me.  It is not “racial justice”, it is my life.  Any document that legitimized the basis for me being regarded as a lesser being should be burned.  “So perish all compromises with tyranny.” Garrison, a Unitarian, was not afraid of radical change.  In this moment, we are called to the same, both outside of our doors and within.

1945…could be today

Fast forward 90 years…

Holding up a copy of the U.S. Constitution, he branded it as “the source and parent of all the other atrocities–‘a covenant with death, and an agreement with hell.'” As the nation’s founding document burned to ashes, he cried out: “So perish all compromises with tyranny!”

Unitarian Minister, Peter Samsom referenced the words of Elmo Roper of Fortune Magazine in his May 27, 1945 sermon “If I Were a Negro” saying that  “…racial and religious prejudices are rising to the point where a revival of Ku Klux Klanism threatens the nation.  Feeling against Negroes, Jews, and Catholics is increasing and we face one of the most explosive situations of our entire history.”

Samsom’s words could have been written last week.  He continues:

“[Roper] concluded his statement by pointing the way out.  As he saw it: “give people something constructive to do and they will not have time to hate each other.” There is good sense in both his warning and his solution.  We know from our own experience that race feeling is growing more serious, that tension is increasing, and that violent things are being said, thought and done.  There is no purpose in shielding ourselves from the knowledge that we are in a situation that calls for our best thinking, our sanest vision, and the most courageous cooperation among our whole people.  “Give people something to do…”—here is a suggestion with sound psychology behind it, a suggestion we may interpret quite broadly to include tasks of the imagination as well as of the hand.” [4]

Give people something to do.  How novel.  I do believe that’s what is missing for us Unitarian Universalists today.  We don’t have anything to do.  I’m not talking about marching or volunteering or calling legislators.  I mean we don’t have anything to do in here.  We have nothing that binds us or belongs to us unquestionably without privilege or bias or exclusion, a situation which begs the question over and over again, what is our faith? What is the concrete place where we meet one another stripped of social dictates of superiority and dominance or marginalization and oppression? Too often, our culture of individualism our philosophical hubris won’t let us put down the “I” to see the “we” and that, my friends, is what is sending me off the rails.

Invitation to Embodiment

“Give people something to do”

You know what? I think we do have something we can unite around…something we all can do.

Embodiment.

Before you voted to call me as your minister, you asked about my theology.  I said I would tell you more.  Well, here it comes…

Turning justice work into religion is not enough to build the beloved community.  Gathering with people who come from the same social set and demographic is not enough to build the beloved community.  Singing Christian songs without the word God or Jesus is not enough to build the beloved community. Creating separate and affirming spaces and affinity groups for marginalized identities is not enough to build the beloved community.  You know why, because after we do our individual and important separate things, we must come back together and that’s what’s missing in what is currently espoused as Unitarian Universalism.  Just because our larger organization is set up as an association of congregations, doesn’t mean that loose association is a successful, model for girding a fragile world against the catastrophic forces of human kind on a large scale.  There has got to be more.

My theology is embodiment.  That is, at the core of everything I do and everything I see, every interaction I have, I place the fact that we are in human bodies.  We all share the experience of life through being embodied.  Why can’t we just start there and say that.  We all share the fact that we were born and that we will die.  We all have minds that allow us to think and we all experience something called time.  We are all capable of action of some kind in the world and we all experience being in the context of planet earth.  Every single human being has some experience with the concept of what we call love.  Birth, Death, Thought, Time, Action, Earth, Love…to me, these are embodiment; this is my theology and this is what keeps me in the game.

There are great minds at work in Unitarian Universalism.  I am thrilled that there are more people talking about spiritual practice and ways to ritualize our shared feelings.  And yes, I have also heard more people talking about bodies.  But it is not just about individual bodies, it is about the fact that we are embodied.  My challenge to you, my invitation to you is to not fall into the trap of relegating what I say about embodiment to a “thing” that resonates with only a few of us.  Thinking about our bodies shouldn’t only happen when someone tells us to place our feet on the ground and “breathe in…breathe out.”  Our bodies can’t be put into a task force or a committee.  Like “racial justice” is my life, the fact that we are embodied is quite literally all of our lives and even if you don’t want to think about your body or deal with it, the fact that you are embodied is definitely going to deal with you.

Imagine a Unitarian Universalism that works to cultivate new ways of putting birth and death in context with one another, in the unique world that we live in today?  Every ancient spiritual tradition has always done this for a reason.  Sure, we can cherry pick from the greats, but that doesn’t bring us any closer together.  What could a language of birth and death that transcends our individual stories, that is conscious of the impact of digital life and life in a post-Holocaust world look and feel like?  I challenge us to find out.  What could a spiritual practice of embracing our ability to think mean as we embrace the broad spectrum of cognitive capabilities that science continues to allow us to understand?  Rather than basing our relationship with different mental perceptions on a narrow baseline, we should be able to embrace the whole spectrum and even more.  What if we let the beautiful spheres of science and spirit we cultivate play together…unsupervised?  Who knows what offspring they would produce.  I say, let’s challenge Unitarian Universalism to throw away its colonial, patriarchal, white-centered shackles and find out.

For too many of us the experience of body shaming came from our birth religions.  We were told that our physical desires were sin, we were told that our bodies needed to be used for one purpose…all kinds of things, so we got out.  Even for lifelong UUs including those in the post-OWL world, they were given a great premise for pride and security in the body, but no follow up on Sunday morning, or in any aspect of how we actually come together as Unitarian Universalists.  Our ideas and more importantly our intentional spiritual commitment to how we are embodied is incomplete.  Dis-embodiment is a hold-over of Puritan roots that may be quaint but is ill suited to our functional needs today. What I’m proposing is that in the search for something to propel us to the center of making real and lasting change in this world and in the search for something that people everywhere are trying desperately understand amidst the noise of extremism, technology and greed, we can answer this call by lifting up the shared glory of what it means to simply exist in human bodies that are both completely separate and one.

Embodiment.

I cannot be satisfied with Seven Principles or Six Sources or a Unitarian Universalism that isn’t willing to grow and evolve into a global spiritual tidal wave.

The title of this message is Mistaken Wisdom.  The title comes from Thoreau who spent a lifetime troubling the space between knowledge of nature and knowledge of the self.  How do we know what we know? He literally explored what it means to see the forest for the trees…and vise versa.  The nature of knowledge is a basic question of Transcendentalism and one that still resonates in UUism today, even in our Seven Principles.  But the Seven Principles and the Six Sources are also swimming in Euro-centric priorities and assumptions; the knowing is skewed to one perspective, because that is the context in which they were created and the population they were devised to serve.  How can one affirm inherent worth and dignity when your personal inherent worth and dignity is always systemically denied? How can you sit at the table if you can’t get in the room?  Our vision must expand so that every identity meets as an equal in the middle.  Therefore, we must be willing to consider how even the sacred Seven principles have been complicit and reflective of the systems we are trying to dismantle and willing if necessary to consign them to the flames of history.  “So perish all compromises with tyranny.”

I cannot be satisfied with Seven Principles or Six Sources or a Unitarian Universalism that isn’t willing to grow and evolve into a global spiritual tidal wave.  The ideas and the openness and the empowerment are all here, we just need something to do.  I say that we have an endless sacred text of learning and wonder and affirmation literally at our finger tips…our bodies.  Each chapter is written in the unique ink of our blood and the pages turn each time we exhale.  Let us escape from a stifled history and feel the cool breeze of the future.  Learning to be present with our embodiment can take us there.  Your beautiful, individual, unique, body is more than a heart rate, or steps, or text messages or any app.  Your body is a chapter in the human adventure of embodiment; it is your greatest gift to receive and your greatest gift to give.

A Prayer of Embodiment

May your birth continue to bless this world throughout your life
May your death whenever it comes, be completion of the cycle and not just loss
May your ability to think equally invite comprehension and question
May you and time move as companions, not adversaries
May your actions reflect your authenticity in this world
May your presence on this earth be both gentle and strong
May you always know love in everything you are.
May you always know your own embodiment as a blessing.

*This sermon was delivered before news of the mass shooting in Texas had broken.

[1] – http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-philosophy

[2] – https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/loving-your-enemies-sermon-delivered-detroit-council-churches-noon-lenten

[3] – https://www.masshist.org/database/431

[4] – Archive of First Unitarian Universalist Church San Diego, Courtesy Betty Boone

If I Had a Bell…

CALL FOR SOLIDARITY AGAINST ALL FORMS OF VIOLENCE: If your spiritual gathering place has a bell, as the minister of First Parish in Cambridge, Unitarian Universalist*, I encourage you to join a growing number of faith communities and ring it on SUNDAY October 8 between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. EST (or in your local time zone). Ring it intentionally with the purpose of first honoring those who have been the targets of violence in our society but also as a warning to those who would promote, glorify or carry out violence and violent rhetoric. This is one simple act that may unite those of us who believe in a world of peace.

First Parish Cambridge will ring its bell 59 times on Sunday to honor all of those impacted by the shooting in Las Vegas. Our message is clear as a bell: we will not be silent in the face of violence.

In a time when too many live under the threat of governmental, societal, political, social, sexual and personal violence, many in the developed world are at a loss as to what can be done. Although we may not agree on the means, surely people from every walk of life can agree on the goal: peace. A culture of violent action is encouraged by violent rhetoric and aggressive and irrational politics. In such a world there must be voices that call for humanity, unity and love.

Bells in houses of worship and spiritual gathering places have historically been signals to the community…of death, of warning, but also of joy and birth. They call us into relationship with the realities of our lives and our worlds and there is no more stark reality that we face today than the fact that a culture of violence is literally killing us all.

On your day of gathering or worship, ring bells. Whether it is your church bell or hand bells or a singing bowl, ring bells to let the world hear that you still believe in peace. Ring them in the morning, ring them in the evening, ring them all over this land.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1337548363040284/

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*This event/action is co-sponsored by First Parish in Cambridge

Wounded Knees

Forgiveness Ceremony

Forgiveness Ceremony at Standing Rock Casino (c) 2016 Josh Morgan/ Huffington Post

The poet in me can’t resist the significance of knees in this week’s episode of America: 400 Years of Racial and Ethnic Culture in Conflict.  First there is the gesture itself: kneeling.  This is what people do when they propose marriage, what they do when they surrender, it is a universally accepted gesture of homage.  It is also an image that is depicted of European colonizers when they landed on the shores of this continent, often being described as kneeling in Christian prayer.  When I read Eric Reid’s Op-Ed reflection on why he and Colin Kaepernick landed on this gesture and not something more dramatic like turning their backs, I’m reminded that, like the history of resisting racism in this country, there are many different layers to how it actually works and what it all means in real time.

The poetry continues when you consider the fact that so many people today associate the playing of the national anthem at sporting events with honoring the armed forces.  A colleague of mine reminded me the other day that no one ever asked if anyone minded this association (which saw a big boost post 9/11).  The national anthem isn’t explicitly a battle cry (it is based on a drinking song).  But looking at the origins of the practice of playing the anthem which was recorded as first happening during a WWI era baseball game, it is very easy to understand the association.  Just in case you forgot, until after the end of WWII, both baseball and the US Military were segregated specifically against blacks.  Anyone who tells you that sports, race and military service have nothing to do with each other, tell them to read a book.

A final (but certainly not the last) piece of poetry that resonates with me is anatomical.  When I think of kneeling and conflict in the United States, the first thing that comes to mind is Wounded Knee.  In Western US culture and history, we are aware of the name “Wounded Knee” because of the massacre that occurred at Wounded Knee Creek.  This slaughter of Indian people (including children) may have taken place nearly 130 years ago, but the battle is ongoing.  The Wounded Knee Massacre is considered by American historians as the last armed conflict between whites and Indian people.  But these historians forget about the resistance at Wounded Knee in 1973.  And of course one just needs to think back a short 12 months ago and remember that descendants of the same Lakota Sioux people who were targeted at Wounded Knee were the same people under threat and ultimately forced off of Standing Rock.

Anatomically, the knee is a pretty amazing joint.  It is designed to absorb the most incredible forces that our bodies sustain.  Its strength and suppleness is the key to evolutionary human survival, allowing for us to run fast, jump and climb.  The knee allows the human body to dance and to create shapes and movements.  It is an incredible juncture within the body.

And human beings have also learned to thrive without knees.  Paralysis, injury, amputation have always opened up different ways to comprehend human movement without the knee.  You don’t need knees (functional or otherwise) to have a beating heart or a brilliant brain.  Even the name of the creek “wounded knee” (Čhaŋkpé Ópi Wakpála) honors a warrior who has lost use of this joint.

The knee can be used to great advantage by human beings.  It can allow us to reach heights that we cannot reach without it.  At the same time the knee is not essential to human life.  It can be immobilized, absent or even just wounded and we will still survive.  These are parallel lessons that people of color in the United States have demonstrated time and time again in the face of oppression.  Today’s battles are not new, the protests are not novel.  This is the perpetual state of things in a nation built on the obliteration of one people and the monetized subjugation of another.  The resilience of people of color in this country, with and without knees in the face of this status quo speaks to our permanence here and across the globe.

If you are flummoxed by the current state of affairs in this country, maybe you need to consider more deeply where your body can bend to have more leverage in the battle or how you can adapt without that joint altogether.  Some of us prove that both are possible every single day.

These Times

Some folks are in agony wondering
“What can we do and how should we feel ‘in these times’?”
Yet, while they’ve been busy
Creating ‘safe’ and ‘brave’ spaces
And learning about ‘diversity’
And pondering what it means to ‘dismantle’ racism in ‘these times’,
‘These times’ have been the entire context for Africans in “America”
‘These times’ have been the human history of rape
‘These times’ have been the ongoing Indian genocide.
Across the globe, right here at home, historical and modern, physical and social
‘These times’ are and have always been right now.
The only reason one could possibly see any of this as either new or shocking
Is because of  the highly evolved, totally unique United States Brand™ privilege.
It is not just a simplistic privilege of skin color
But the complex construction of an entire privilege culture
Based on race, fueled by fear, multiplied by greed
Locked in systems of opportunity, loaded in government
And fired down the barrel of a very specific social order
Laying waste to everyone in its sights.
The only way to truly deal with ‘these times’
Is to admit that ‘these times’ are business as usual
Face all the signs that say we have to start from scratch
And begin the experiment entirely anew.

Reid Kaepernick

Eric Reid, Colin Kaepernick, kneeling during the National Anthem (c) 2016 Marcio Jose Sanchez/ AP

Jefferson’s Democracy

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Democracy before decency…
Jefferson’s greatest deed
Sealed in the American creed that
“All men are created equal”
Too often holds these truths to be self-evident:
That “men” exclusively means “male”
And “equal” is only painted from the palette of white skin
And being “created” is synonymous with
an individual right to material wealth.

Democracy before decency…
Jefferson’s “gradual abolition”
Evolved into the prolapse of civil rights
Where what is most basic became most rare
A moral inversion secured in place by law
An ethical hesitation justified by greed
An excuse later celebrated under the blazing lynching tree
Where assumptions of dominance
Were seared into the genetic memories
Of both the “dis” and the “en” franchised class.

Democracy before decency…
Jefferson’s assumptions are
Captured today in words that
Dribble off the lips of those
Who see “both sides” of racial hatred
And try to “defend” free speech and First Amendment rights
To maintain the same status quo that birthed the horrors of
Slavery, genocide, colonial sexual servitude
And the posture that denies its paternity to the progeny called
Holocaust.

Democracy before decency,
Pride before dignity,
Profit before prophetic,
“We” before “all”,
Process before people…
This is history repeating
And failing over and over
and over.

There is no democracy
If the truth of decency makes a mockery of humanity;
There is no democracy
When civil rights are based on moral wrongs;
There is no democracy
In free speech that secures the end of a noose;
There is no democracy that un-sees, un-hears…
That too easily forgets.
There is no democracy in rape.

Mr. Jefferson,
We have learned the hard way
That there can be no democracy
Without truly common human decency first.

– ALD

Presidents and Pulpits

SFG-Coral-Ghost-Eye-2-main-image-cropA response to the election of Susan Frederick-Gray as the next president of the Unitarian Universalist Association.

I am excited that the Unitarian Universalist Association has elected Susan Frederick-Gray as our next president and I wish her many blessings.  I will support her work enthusiastically.  At the same time, within this celebration of breaking one more glass ceiling, I feel compelled to continue looking forward in order to understand how Unitarian Universalists can truly live the lofty values we put forward.  This election is only one step in a series of many that must happen for us to accomplish that goal.  I will not rehash the troubled journey within the UUA over the last three or four months, nor will I debate the history of racial and gender bias in the denominational leadership.  Instead, as a new minister about to assume the great responsibility and privilege of leadership at the pleasure of a long standing and dedicated congregation, my question is much more basic: why must the President of the UUA be a minister?

On a simple level, it is very easy to see the structure of governance and the balance between “professional” and “lay” leadership that is attempted in our association.  Yet it is that same balance, that says to me having a minister at the helm of the entire Association seems an arrangement we should question in today’s world.  What is more, considering the specificity of how our ministerial leadership is developed in terms of educational pedigree, demographics, economics, age and ability it seems like we are perpetuating the very systems of exclusivity that we are asking our spiritual community to commit to unraveling.  Above everything else, the challenges of the world in which Unitarian Universalism as an organization is being asked to navigate are not challenges that our ministers are being explicitly prepared to meet as organizational leaders.

I’m well aware of some of the incredible professional histories that our past and new president bring to the table.  They are remarkable and multi-skilled people with passion and dedication.  They are immensely qualified leaders.  What is more, a minister leading a religious/faith organization just seems appropriate; one wouldn’t ask Elon Musk to lead the Episcopal Church.  But then again why not?  The assumption that a minister will lead a spiritual organization is status quo thinking and I’m sure that the progress we want to see over the next 10 – 20 years is not status quo progress.  When I look at the list and background of our history of Association leadership we have been blessed to draw the cream of the crop; but it is only a ministerial crop.  What are we missing by not looking across all of the crops within our vast acreage of talent?

I have had the pleasure to meet many incredible people in our congregations and the bulk of them are not ministers.  I have met lay leaders and professionals including Religious Educators, Musicians and Administrators.  They are former and current corporate and non-profit executives, they are lifelong organizers and activists, they are teachers and professors and they are deemed as somehow not qualified to lead this organization because they lack the title “The Reverend.” As a denomination, we place a lot of weight on the three-letter abbreviation (Rev.) But the title doesn’t make the person.  One of the greatest lessons I have learned through my own ministerial formation takes its cue from something Michelle Obama once said about her husband and the Presidency of the United States: “Being president doesn’t change who you are, it reveals who you are.”  Becoming a ministerial leader is the same way, it is a process of constantly peeling away layers until you are your most forthright and present self.  Even then you continue to evolve and change and discover new layers of truth and strength.  It tests you in ways that until now, I’ve only seen from the outside.  But coming to ministry from a very different background of management, it is also very easy for me to see that the crucible that is ministerial formation does not guarantee that one will always be an effective organizational leader or that they will peel away the most restricting layers. It also doesn’t guarantee that one will be the right leader at the right time.  Again, leadership, any leadership is something that is revealed.

As we embrace the new direction of leadership that will be revealed in Susan Frederick-Gray’s tenure, I say hallelujah let’s celebrate!  But I would also say that it is not the time for us to sit back with relief and sigh “whew…at last, we did it!”  We’ve only rolled on to the tarmac, we haven’t taken flight yet.  Rather, it is the time to embrace Susan’s forward thinking and the forward thinking of all the candidates and say “what a great FIRST step toward wholeness!”  We have a long way to go my friends.  We are preparing for a long flight.  Let’s continue to challenge the structures that cultivate complacency, dominant culture oppression and mono-cultural vision.  At last we’ve proven that our leadership can rock a pair of heels (if she wants to…thank you Sofia Betancourt, Susan Frederick-Gray, Alison Miller and Jeanne Pupke).  Now, let’s keep proving that both our leadership and our lived faith can reflect the economic, racial, social, cultural, ability and educational diversity that we talk so much about.

We Are Jazz

(Cambridge, MA) A month ago, I wrote a post that gave some reflection on the issues of race and diversity within the Unitarian Universalist Association (HERE). Since that time, UU Religious Educators have called on our churches to spend this week and next engaged in a UU White Supremacy Teach In.  This is an opportunity for us to deeply explore the real problems of race in our congregations, our denomination and hopefully in our nation.  On a day when the Trump administration has signed an executive order that masquerades as “liberty” but will allow religious entities to flagrantly discriminate against LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, women in general and anyone else they choose to class as “other”, I am reminded that marriage between white and non-white people was only made legal in my lifetime and some of the biggest defenders of that restriction were religious entities.  I am also in that same breath extremely proud of Unitarian Universalists stepping forward to fully own the painful complexity of race and ethnicity in this nation.

Last Sunday, April 30, I preached a sermon that I didn’t know I could preach.  It is blunt in its language about race and racism in the United States. It is not religious language per-se, but it is the language of passion and deeply spiritual belief that we cannot “fix” racism, until we actually and honestly recognize its horror.  May we find the strength as more and more horror is heaped on us, to continue to look at what we are faced with, continue to find strength in one another and continue to fight with every bone in our bodies to eradicate any force that attempts to play true liberty and justice for fools.  We are beings that are created of love and innovation.  We are jazz.

RECORDING AVAILABLE HERE

PDF of We Are Jazz, Sermon delivered at First Parish of Cambridge, Unitarian Universalist, April 30, 2017

(Please note: this printed version is a direct preaching manuscript and not a fully edited and corrected version fo publishing.  There are most likely a couple of typos and highlights that are for delivery purposes more than reading purposes, but there has been a great demand from people interested in reading this.)

– ALD

Held in the Passion

Awaken now
Cradled in God’s love.
Here, there is total ecstasy.
Arm draped about waist
Head in the crook of shoulder
Feet and legs entwined
Warmth igniting skin
In and around
With a yearning beyond bodies.
Hair entangled turning,
Breath pungent with the odor of time
The smell of holiness, wholeness,
Safety and sacredness.
Drawing closer,
Aroused and drowsy,
Enflamed heart pounding with anticipation,
Pulsing flushed neck burning for this perfect kiss.
Aching to yield.
Never forsaken.

Easter is about many things for many people but for me it is about the complete embodiment of the relationship to faith.  In one story, there is affirmation, defiance, accusation, death and even resurrection…all of it pivoting on one supreme moment of thoroughly human doubt:

“My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?” (Mt 27:46 and Mk 15:34)

…answered by the miracle of rebirth.

It is the story of both the end and the beginning of a great love affair between human mortality and salvation.  For the non-Christian, it is the symbolic act of leaning in to the agony of struggle and rising in the destiny of being called to action against the forces that deny love.  Regardless of how you receive its message, Easter can be the embodiment of a threshold between the merely coy desire for faith and the consummation of divine grace.

Peace

-ALD